How Koffee’s ‘Toast’ is Becoming A Lesbian Anthem.

Koffee
Koffee

When the Grammy Award winning, Koffee, released “Toast”, it did not take long for the song to become an international hit and stamped the reggae princess as one of the best musical talents out of Jamaica. The song straddled the line between dancehall and hip hop and fully displayed Koffee’s brilliant writing ability.

Toast, yeah (mmh yeah)
Say we a come in wid a force, yeah
Blessings we a reap pon we course inna hand full
We nuh rise and boast
Yeah we give thanks like we need it the most
We haffi give thanks like we really supposed to, be thankful!

The song became the lead single for her album Rapture which went on to win the Reggae Grammy award, making Koffee not only the youngest artist to win the Grammy at 19-years-old but also the first solo female act to win in the reggae category.

“Toast” was praised for its message of gratitude and thankfulness which broke away from the tired and played out topic in the dancehall genre where 90 percent of the music was talking about how good a person was in the bedroom or their body count in the streets.

Related Article:   Dear people of Jamaica.

Somehow the song is now becoming a lesbian anthem that gay women use when they turn to other women to help them get through the hardships of life rather than turning to a man. “Buss a Toast fi di friends weh tek off heavy load.”

Koffee has never went on record about being a lesbian, or bi, or queer, but dancehall fans have taken it upon themselves the question the sexuality of the future reggae legend. So far, the only thing the public knows about the artist is that she makes great music and always leave fans waiting for her next release.

So why is Koffee’s “Toast” becoming such a huge facet of lesbian culture?

For one, Koffee is a Jamaican. Whether rightfully so or not, Jamaica is considered one of the most homophobic country in the world only lagging behind extreme Islamist countries like Iran and Saudi Arabia. If Koffee can somehow be forced into the “gay corner” while still being loved and embraced by Jamaicans then that would go a long way in getting the country to be more accepting of homosexuality. The homosexual movement has already succeeded in getting Buju Banton, another legend of reggae music, to denounce his own song “Boom bye bye”, which is considered by many to be one of the most homophobic songs ever released.

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Of course being thankful and gracious is not lesbian specific, quite the contrary. In fact, nowhere is thankfulness and grace on high display like in a church, yet it is a known fact that churches in general are way more homophobic than Jamaica ever was, is, or ever will be.

So what was just a reggae song of thankfulness has become a sing along at many a lesbian gatherings. That might be the farthest thing Koffee intended when she was writing the song but that’s what it has become.

The fact is, every living person has a lot to be thankful for, so “Toast” is a song for every living person, however, lesbians have decided to make it their own.

Koffee gave the world a great song in “Toast” but for lesbians she gave them an anthem.

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