Shenseea wants to get rid of Black History Month.

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18 Karat Reggae Gold 2021 : ONENESS
18 Karat Reggae Gold 2021 : ONENESS
Shenseea
Shenseea

Either Shenseea is trying to build a redneck fanbase or she has forgotten that she is half Black, but the Dancehall singjay turned rapper is sick of Black History Month. Despite the sacrifices so many brave Black men and women have made in the fight for equal rights and justice, the “Lick” singer says February should no longer be Black History Month.

“February is now BLACK FUTURE MONTH‼️ #BFM,” Shenseea posted on her Instagram.

Many of her Black fans were very displeased with the post but Shenseea might not care since just last week she said in no uncertain terms that she has used Dancehall for what she wanted and is now looking for bigger things.

Black History Month is an annual observance originating in the United States, where it is also known as African-American History Month. It has received official recognition from governments in the United States and Canada, and more recently has been observed in Ireland, and the United Kingdom. It began as a way of remembering important people and events in the history of the African diaspora. It is celebrated in February in the United States and Canada, while in Ireland, and the United Kingdom it is observed in October.

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The precursor to Black History Month was created in 1926 in the United States, when historian Carter G. Woodson and the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History announced the second week of February to be “Negro History Week”. This week was chosen because it coincided with the birthday of Abraham Lincoln on February 12 and that of Frederick Douglass on February 14, both of which dates black communities had celebrated together since the late 19th century. Negro History Week was the center of the equation. The thought process behind the week was never recorded, but scholars acknowledge two reasons for its birth: recognition and importance. Woodson felt deeply that at least one week would allow for the general movement to become something annually celebrated. Also, after the ten-year-long effort to successfully complete his Journal of Negro History, he realized the subject deserved to resonate with a greater audience.

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