Could marijuana have saved Rachel Held Evans’ life?

Rachel Held Evans
Could marijuana have treated Rachel Held Evans' seizures?

Popular Christian writer, Rachel Held Evans, has died at the tender age of 37 and many are wondering if marijuana could have saved the New York Times best-selling author’s life.

According to Rachel’s husband, Daniel, she was put into a medically induced coma on April 19th after doctors found out she was having constant seizures while treating her for an infection. He claims that doctors were never able to treat the seizures or find the root cause of the seizures.

“The hospital team worked to diagnose the primary cause of her seizures and proactively treated for some known possible causes for which diagnostics were not immediately available due to physical limitations,” he wrote.

While marijuana is the best known treatment for seizures, it most like was not used on Rachel because in the state of Tennessee, marijuana is illegal for both recreational and medical uses.

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According to WebMD; “The FDA recently approved the drug Epidiolex, which is made from CBD (a marijuana extract), as a therapy for people with very severe or hard-to-treat seizures. In studies, some people had a dramatic drop in seizures after taking the drug.”

Many people with severe seizures have reported to experience significant reduction in seizures after smoking marijuana. Because marijuana is illegal at the federal level, no real scientific federal tests have been done to prove or disprove this fact.

If Miss Evans was living in a state where marijuana was legal, she would have had the drug at her disposal but unfortunately that’s not the case in Tennessee.

Tennessee is one of the remaining 18 states that criminalize patients who use marijuana to treat various illnesses such seizures and insomnia.

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In November 2018, voters in Oklahoma, Missouri, and Utah approved compassionate medical cannabis laws. Unfortunately, Tennessee doesn’t have a voter initiative process, so only elected officials have the power to change state law.

Hopefully something good can come out of the death of this famous author. It is time for Tennessee and all other states where medical marijuana is illegal to take another look at their marijuana laws.

It would be a great shame if Rachel Held Evans dies from a health issue that could have been treated with something as simple, safe and natural as marijuana.

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